Debatable Issues Underlying Whole-Language Philosophy A Speech-Language Pathologist’s Perspective Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1992
Debatable Issues Underlying Whole-Language Philosophy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Holly Rose Shapiro, PhD
    Private Practice, Deerfield, Illinois
  • Contact author: Holly Rose Shapiro, PhD, 1119 Country Lane, Deerfield, IL 60015.
    Contact author: Holly Rose Shapiro, PhD, 1119 Country Lane, Deerfield, IL 60015.×
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1992
Debatable Issues Underlying Whole-Language Philosophy
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1992, Vol. 23, 308-311. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2304.308
History: Received June 17, 1991 , Accepted February 10, 1992
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1992, Vol. 23, 308-311. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2304.308
History: Received June 17, 1991; Accepted February 10, 1992

This article challenges two important assumptions underlying whole-language philosophy: (a) spoken language is directly comparable to written language, and (b) skilled readers rely on contextual information more than on the printed word. Aspects of whole-language practice that stem from the above assumptions are discussed. The speech-language pathology profession is urged to engage in some of the instructional practices that have come to be associated with whole language. However, language professionals also are encouraged to advocate methodologies that are inconsistent with the whole-language position.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The author acknowledges the assistance of two anonymous reviewers for their comments on earlier drafts of this paper.
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