Clinical Applications of Recent Advances in Phonological Theory Historically, the behavioral theory of articulation that was applied to clinical assessment was consistent with the behavioral theory of developmental change that was applied to intervention. However, more recent applications of cognitively oriented linguistic theories have not been accompanied by novel intervention approaches. This article reviews some recent advances in ... Clinical Forum
EDITOR'S AWARD
Clinical Forum  |   July 01, 1992
Clinical Applications of Recent Advances in Phonological Theory
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard G. Schwartz, PhD
    City University of New York, New York
  • Contact author: Richard G. Schwartz, PhD, Speech and Hearing Sciences, The Graduate School and University Center, City University of New York, 33 West 42 Street, New York, NY 10036.
    Contact author: Richard G. Schwartz, PhD, Speech and Hearing Sciences, The Graduate School and University Center, City University of New York, 33 West 42 Street, New York, NY 10036.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum: Phonological Assessment and Treatment
Clinical Forum   |   July 01, 1992
Clinical Applications of Recent Advances in Phonological Theory
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1992, Vol. 23, 269-276. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2303.269
History: Received November 14, 1991 , Accepted April 2, 1992
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1992, Vol. 23, 269-276. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2303.269
History: Received November 14, 1991; Accepted April 2, 1992

Historically, the behavioral theory of articulation that was applied to clinical assessment was consistent with the behavioral theory of developmental change that was applied to intervention. However, more recent applications of cognitively oriented linguistic theories have not been accompanied by novel intervention approaches. This article reviews some recent advances in phonological theories, including autosegmental, metrical, and lexical phonology, and their potential applications. A new theory of developmental change that also is cognitive in its orientation is presented, along with some preliminary suggestions for clinical applications.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Preparation of this article was supported by Public Health Service Grant R01 DC 00583-04, input-output relationships in speech and language impairments, from the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. The author thanks Marc Fey, Alan Kamhi, and an anonymous reviewer for their insightful comments on an earlier draft of this paper.
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