The Need for a Broad-Based Model of Phonological Disorders My response to Fey’s article (1985; reprinted 1992, this issue) focuses on the confusion caused by the application of simplistic phonological definitions and models to the assessment and treatment of children with speech delays. In addition to having no explanatory adequacy, such definitions/models lead either to assessment and treatment procedures ... Clinical Forum
EDITOR'S AWARD
Clinical Forum  |   July 01, 1992
The Need for a Broad-Based Model of Phonological Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alan G. Kamhi, PhD
    Memphis State University, TN
  • Contact author: Alan G. Kamhi, PhD, Memphis Speech and Hearing Center, 807 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, TN 38105.
    Contact author: Alan G. Kamhi, PhD, Memphis Speech and Hearing Center, 807 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, TN 38105.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum: Phonological Assessment and Treatment
Clinical Forum   |   July 01, 1992
The Need for a Broad-Based Model of Phonological Disorders
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1992, Vol. 23, 261-268. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2303.261
History: Received July 8, 1991 , Accepted March 23, 1992
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1992, Vol. 23, 261-268. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2303.261
History: Received July 8, 1991; Accepted March 23, 1992

My response to Fey’s article (1985; reprinted 1992, this issue) focuses on the confusion caused by the application of simplistic phonological definitions and models to the assessment and treatment of children with speech delays. In addition to having no explanatory adequacy, such definitions/models lead either to assessment and treatment procedures that are similarly focused or to procedures that have no clear logical ties to the models with which they supposedly are linked. Narrowly focused models and definitions also usually include no mention of speech production processes. Bemoaning this state of affairs, I attempt to show why it is important for clinicians to embrace broad-based models of phonological disorders that have some explanatory value. Such models are consistent with assessment procedures that are comprehensive in nature and treatment procedures that focus on linguistic, as well as motoric, aspects of speech.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The author thanks Marc Fey, Mary Elbert, Paul Hoffman, and Karen Pollock for their helpful comments on earlier drafts of this paper.
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