Articulation and Phonology Inextricable Constructs in Speech Pathology Clinical Forum
EDITOR'S AWARD
Clinical Forum  |   July 01, 1992
Articulation and Phonology
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marc E. Fey, PhD
    University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario
  • * Reprinted with permission from Human Communication Canada (now Journal of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology), (1985) 9(1), 7–16.
    Reprinted with permission from Human Communication Canada (now Journal of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology), (1985) 9(1), 7–16.×
  • ** Marc E. Fey is currently at the University of Kansas Medical Center.
    Marc E. Fey is currently at the University of Kansas Medical Center.×
  • Contact author: Marc E. Fey, PhD, Department of Hearing & Speech, School of Allied Health, University of Kansas Medical Center, 39th & Rainbow Road, Kansas City, KS 66103.
    Contact author: Marc E. Fey, PhD, Department of Hearing & Speech, School of Allied Health, University of Kansas Medical Center, 39th & Rainbow Road, Kansas City, KS 66103.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum: Phonological Assessment and Treatment
Clinical Forum   |   July 01, 1992
Articulation and Phonology
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1992, Vol. 23, 225-232. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2303.225
History: Received December 20, 1990 , Accepted January 31, 1991
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1992, Vol. 23, 225-232. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2303.225
History: Received December 20, 1990; Accepted January 31, 1991

For many speech-language pathologists, the application of the concepts of phonology to the assessment and treatment of phonologically disordered children has produced more confusion than clinical assistance. At least part of this confusion seems to be due to the expectation that, since new terms are being used, new clinical techniques should differ radically from the old ones. The basic intent of this paper is to show that adopting a phonological approach to dealing with speech sound disorders does not necessitate a rejection of the well-established principles underlying traditional approaches to articulation disorders. To the contrary, articulation must be recognized as a critical aspect of speech sound development under any theory. Consequently, phonological principles should be viewed as adding new dimensions and a new perspective to an old problem, not simply as refuting established principles. These new principles have resulted in the development of several procedures that differ in many respects from old procedures, yet are highly similar in others. Whether phonological approaches are better than existing procedures remains an important, but unanswered question.

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