Attitudes Toward Mild Misarticulation-Disordered Peers It is worth noting that there is a body of literature that has consistently documented the comparatively negative attitudes of children toward their misarticulating peers. The most recent contribution, “Attitudes of Fourth and Sixth Graders Toward Peers with Mild Articulation Disorders” (Crowe Hall, 1991), has shown that normal speakers are ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   April 01, 1992
Attitudes Toward Mild Misarticulation-Disordered Peers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Charles L. Madison
    Washington State University, Spokane
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   April 01, 1992
Attitudes Toward Mild Misarticulation-Disordered Peers
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1992, Vol. 23, 188. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2302.188
History: Received May 6, 1991 , Accepted June 3, 1991
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1992, Vol. 23, 188. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2302.188
History: Received May 6, 1991; Accepted June 3, 1991
It is worth noting that there is a body of literature that has consistently documented the comparatively negative attitudes of children toward their misarticulating peers. The most recent contribution, “Attitudes of Fourth and Sixth Graders Toward Peers with Mild Articulation Disorders” (Crowe Hall, 1991), has shown that normal speakers are judged more positively than misarticulating speakers and that these attitudes transcend perspective. That is, misarticulating speakers are viewed more negatively as speakers, as grade peers, and as future peers. Disturbingly, sixth graders were more negative in their attitudes than fourth graders. Crowe Hall also confirmed some interesting gender differences.
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