Effects of Phonological Impairment on Word, Syllable, and Phoneme Segmentation and Reading The primary purpose of this study was to compare the phonological awareness ability of children with persistent phonological impairment to that of phonologically normal children. We also studied the impact of speech intelligibility on beginning reading skills. Eleven moderate to severely unintelligible children and 11 phonologically normal children between the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1992
Effects of Phonological Impairment on Word, Syllable, and Phoneme Segmentation and Reading
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Penelope E. Webster, EdD
    University of New Hampshire, Durham
  • Amy Solomon Plante
    University of New Hampshire, Durham
  • Contact author: Penelope E. Webster, EdD, Department of Communication Disorders, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824-3538.
    Contact author: Penelope E. Webster, EdD, Department of Communication Disorders, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824-3538.×
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1992
Effects of Phonological Impairment on Word, Syllable, and Phoneme Segmentation and Reading
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1992, Vol. 23, 176-182. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2302.176
History: Received March 11, 1991 , Accepted September 30, 1991
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1992, Vol. 23, 176-182. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2302.176
History: Received March 11, 1991; Accepted September 30, 1991

The primary purpose of this study was to compare the phonological awareness ability of children with persistent phonological impairment to that of phonologically normal children. We also studied the impact of speech intelligibility on beginning reading skills. Eleven moderate to severely unintelligible children and 11 phonologically normal children between the ages of 6:5 (years:months) and 8:6 were administered four measures of phonological awareness and one measure of word recognition (reading) ability. Phonologically normal children scored significantly higher on three of the four phonological awareness measures. There were no significant differences for word recognition. Multiple regression analysis yielded speech intelligibility as a highly significant predictor of performance on three of the four phonological awareness tasks. We concluded that phonological awareness is closely associated with productive phonological ability independent of mental age, chronological age, and educational experience.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Portions of this manuscript were presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association meeting in Seattle, Washington, November, 1990. This research was supported by a University of New Hampshire Central University Research Fund Grant awarded to the first author.
The authors thank Ms. Celeste Bentley for her assistance in data collection, Dr. L. Michael Couvillion for his assistance in statistical analysis, and the Nottingham (New Hampshire) Elementary School for help in subject recruitment.
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