The Voiced/Voiceless Phonation Time in Children With and Without Laryngeal Pathology Eleven children with vocal pathology were matched to 11 normal speaking children. All subjects produced maximum duration of phonation for /s/and /z/from detailed instructions and clinician models. The s/z ratio also was calculated. Results showed no difference in /s/durations between groups, but /z/durations and s/z ratios were significantly different. The ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1992
The Voiced/Voiceless Phonation Time in Children With and Without Laryngeal Pathology
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David N. Sorensen, PhD
    Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID
  • Pamela Ann Parker
    Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID
  • Contact author: David N. Sorensen, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Campus Box 8116, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209.
    Contact author: David N. Sorensen, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Campus Box 8116, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1992
The Voiced/Voiceless Phonation Time in Children With and Without Laryngeal Pathology
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1992, Vol. 23, 163-168. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2302.163
History: Received April 25, 1991 , Accepted August 30, 1991
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1992, Vol. 23, 163-168. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2302.163
History: Received April 25, 1991; Accepted August 30, 1991

Eleven children with vocal pathology were matched to 11 normal speaking children. All subjects produced maximum duration of phonation for /s/and /z/from detailed instructions and clinician models. The s/z ratio also was calculated. Results showed no difference in /s/durations between groups, but /z/durations and s/z ratios were significantly different. The /z/durations and s/z ratio results differ from those of previous research. Possible reasons for these differences are task construction and instructional variables. Results are discussed in relationship to these variables, as well as in relationship to reduced glottal efficiency.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This paper is based on a Master’s thesis completed by Pamela Ann Parker. Portions of this paper were presented at the Annual
Convention of the American-Speech-Language and Hearing Association, Boston, 1988.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access