Effect of Dialect on the Determination of Speech-Reception Thresholds in Spanish-Speaking Children Word lists spoken in Castillian, Caribbean, and Mexican dialects were compared as stimuli for the determination of speech-reception thresholds (SRT) in 12 6- to 7-year-old Spanish-speaking, Puerto Rican children, using a balanced, crossover design. No statistically significant differences were found among dialects. All subjects had SRTs that were 2 dB ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1992
Effect of Dialect on the Determination of Speech-Reception Thresholds in Spanish-Speaking Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bonnie Sue Schneider, MS, CCC-A
    Newington Children’s Hospital, Newington, CT
  • Contact author: Bonnie Sue Schneider, MS, CCC-A, Audiology Supervisor, Newington Children's Hospital, 181 East Cedar Street, Newington, CT 06111.
    Contact author: Bonnie Sue Schneider, MS, CCC-A, Audiology Supervisor, Newington Children's Hospital, 181 East Cedar Street, Newington, CT 06111.×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1992
Effect of Dialect on the Determination of Speech-Reception Thresholds in Spanish-Speaking Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1992, Vol. 23, 159-162. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2302.159
History: Received March 11, 1991 , Accepted August 30, 1991
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1992, Vol. 23, 159-162. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2302.159
History: Received March 11, 1991; Accepted August 30, 1991

Word lists spoken in Castillian, Caribbean, and Mexican dialects were compared as stimuli for the determination of speech-reception thresholds (SRT) in 12 6- to 7-year-old Spanish-speaking, Puerto Rican children, using a balanced, crossover design. No statistically significant differences were found among dialects. All subjects had SRTs that were 2 dB lower than (p<0.01), but highly correlated with, their pure-tone averages (rs>0.85). The lower SRTs were not deemed clinically significant. The results indicate that dialect is of minor importance in SRT testing of Puerto Rican children in this age range.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The author thanks the following people for their assistance: Ruth DeMaio, scheduling and secretarial work; Luisa Santi, Spanish interpretations; Tracy Riordan, art and secretarial work; and Tony Malavenda and Robert Nearine, who provided coordination with the Hartford Board of Education. The author also thanks her husband, Dr. Paul A. Kramer; Zane Saunders and Lisa Nystrom Mute from the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology; and Marianna Nelson from the Office of Research Services for their suggestions, help, and encouragement.
This study was finded by a grant from the Newington Children’s Hospital Research Fund in 1987. The paper was presented as part of the Newington Children’s Hospital First Annual Research Program, November 28, 1990, where it received honorable mention.
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