Speech-Language Pathologists’ Perceptions of Administrative Support and Non-Support The purpose of this study was to investigate speech-language pathologists’ perceptions of administrative support and non-support. Structured interview questions were used to elicit responses from 20 master’s level speech-language pathologists. Their perceptions of administrative support and non-support were divided into four primary areas: working conditions/resources, advocacy, staff development, and program ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1992
Speech-Language Pathologists’ Perceptions of Administrative Support and Non-Support
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katherine F. Schetz
    Montgomery County Schools, Christiansburg, Virginia
  • Bonnie S. Billingsley
    Virginia Tech, Blacksburg
  • Contact author: Katherine F. Schetz, 607 Rainbow Ridge, Blacksburg, Virginia 24060.
    Contact author: Katherine F. Schetz, 607 Rainbow Ridge, Blacksburg, Virginia 24060.×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Practice Management / Professional Issues & Training / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1992
Speech-Language Pathologists’ Perceptions of Administrative Support and Non-Support
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1992, Vol. 23, 153-158. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2302.153
History: Received February 21, 1991 , Accepted June 10, 1991
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1992, Vol. 23, 153-158. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2302.153
History: Received February 21, 1991; Accepted June 10, 1991

The purpose of this study was to investigate speech-language pathologists’ perceptions of administrative support and non-support. Structured interview questions were used to elicit responses from 20 master’s level speech-language pathologists. Their perceptions of administrative support and non-support were divided into four primary areas: working conditions/resources, advocacy, staff development, and program assistance. Findings indicated that support has many dimensions, including provisions for adequate working conditions and resources, advocacy for the speech-language pathologist and the speech-language program, and facilitation of professional staff development. Implications for supervisors and administrators of speech-language pathologists’ perceptions of administrative support and non-support are suggested.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Preparation of this article was supported in part by the Virginia Department of Education, Division of Special Education Management and Programs.
We gratefully acknowledge Peggy Littrell, Mary Beth Hendricks, Jannis Floyd, and Beverly Cline for their assistance.
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