Hunter’s Syndrome and Its Management in a Public School Setting Hunter’s syndrome is a progressive, degenerative, genetic disorder that results from faulty functioning of the enzymes responsible for breaking down mucopolysaccharides, the complex carbohydrates found in connective tissue. When incompletely degraded mucopolysaccharides accumulate throughout the body, numerous muscular and skeletal changes occur. Typically, hearing loss and eventual upper airway obstruction ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1992
Hunter’s Syndrome and Its Management in a Public School Setting
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carol Sober Alpern, PhD
    Pace University, New York
  • Contact author: Carol S. Alpern, PhD, Department of Speech Communication Studies, Pace University, 41 Park Row, New York, NY 10038.
    Contact author: Carol S. Alpern, PhD, Department of Speech Communication Studies, Pace University, 41 Park Row, New York, NY 10038.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / School-Based Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1992
Hunter’s Syndrome and Its Management in a Public School Setting
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1992, Vol. 23, 102-106. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2302.102
History: Received February 22, 1990 , Accepted April 15, 1991
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1992, Vol. 23, 102-106. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2302.102
History: Received February 22, 1990; Accepted April 15, 1991

Hunter’s syndrome is a progressive, degenerative, genetic disorder that results from faulty functioning of the enzymes responsible for breaking down mucopolysaccharides, the complex carbohydrates found in connective tissue. When incompletely degraded mucopolysaccharides accumulate throughout the body, numerous muscular and skeletal changes occur. Typically, hearing loss and eventual upper airway obstruction result in a degeneration of speech and language functioning. Presented here is a case study of a child with the mild form of Hunter’s syndrome. This study demonstrates the typical delay in diagnosis and shows how a team approach can maintain such a child in a regular public school setting.

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