Sharing Test of Auditory Comprehension Results With Parents Often, professionals anecdotally express concerns regarding the quantity of information conveyed to parents during Individual Educational Program (IEP) meetings. A significant part of these meetings involves the sharing of test results; however, parents often appear (and informally report) to feel overwhelmed by the findings and implications of these tests. In ... Clinical Exchange
Clinical Exchange  |   January 01, 1992
Sharing Test of Auditory Comprehension Results With Parents
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kris English
    County Office of Education, San Diego, CA, Child Language Intervention Program, University of Pittsburgh, 500 Iroquois Building, Pittsburgh, PA 15213
  • Requests for reprints may be sent to Kris English, Child Language Intervention Program, University of Pittsburgh, 500 Iroquois Building, Pittsburgh, PA 15213.
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Clinical Exchange
Clinical Exchange   |   January 01, 1992
Sharing Test of Auditory Comprehension Results With Parents
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1992, Vol. 23, 88-90. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2301.88
History: Received February 7, 1991 , Accepted April 23, 1991
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1992, Vol. 23, 88-90. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2301.88
History: Received February 7, 1991; Accepted April 23, 1991
Often, professionals anecdotally express concerns regarding the quantity of information conveyed to parents during Individual Educational Program (IEP) meetings. A significant part of these meetings involves the sharing of test results; however, parents often appear (and informally report) to feel overwhelmed by the findings and implications of these tests. In the interest of improving the information-sharing process, the following form was developed and piloted for the Test of Auditory Comprehension (TAC) (1981).
In order to be “parent-friendly,” the form was designed to (a) better explain the subtests of the TAC and their inherent IEP goals, (b) show progress in development from year to year, and (c) provide parents with information to take home and review at their convenience. Consequently, the results of the subtests were supplemented with examples, and the terms “pass/fail” (from the official reporting form) were replaced with markers identifying skills as emerging, mastered, or anticipated future goals. No-carbon-required (NCR) paper was used so that the parent could take a copy home. Copies were also needed for the student’s cumulative file and for the person responsible for annual assessment.
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