Voice Deviations and Coexisting Communication Disorders The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which other communicative disorders coexist with voice disorders in school children. The authors randomly selected two voice deviant groups and a control group from a database of nearly 39,000 school children in grades 1–12. Hoarseness was the most commonly ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1992
Voice Deviations and Coexisting Communication Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kenneth O. St. Louis
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, 805 Allen Hall, P.O. Box 6122, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6122
  • Gregory G. R. Hansen
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, 805 Allen Hall, P.O. Box 6122, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6122
  • Janice L. Buch
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, 805 Allen Hall, P.O. Box 6122, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6122
  • Tonia L. Oliver
    Kanawha County Schools, Charleston, West Virginia
  • Requests for reprints may be sent to Kenneth O. St. Louis, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, 805 Allen Hall, P.O. Box 6122, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6122.
Article Information
Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1992
Voice Deviations and Coexisting Communication Disorders
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1992, Vol. 23, 82-87. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2301.82
History: Received August 13, 1990 , Accepted February 14, 1991
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1992, Vol. 23, 82-87. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2301.82
History: Received August 13, 1990; Accepted February 14, 1991

The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which other communicative disorders coexist with voice disorders in school children. The authors randomly selected two voice deviant groups and a control group from a database of nearly 39,000 school children in grades 1–12. Hoarseness was the most commonly occurring voice disorder in both groups. The majority of voice disordered children had coexisting articulation deviations. In addition, the voice disordered samples differed significantly from controls on two language measures and mean pure-tone hearing thresholds. This study supports other research indicating that different communication disorders frequently coexist.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors greatly appreciate the assistance of the following West Virginia University students in the data collection and analysis for this study: Julie Kent, LeAnn Ziembicki, Mary Orlando, and Elizabeth Salisbury. Special thanks are given to Dennis M. Ruscello for his assistance in obtaining reliability judgments.
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