Developing Oral Communication in Students With Hearing Impairments Whose Responsibility? Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1992
Developing Oral Communication in Students With Hearing Impairments
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amy Otis-Wilborn, Ph.D.
    Department of Exceptional Education, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Enderis Hall, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201
  • Requests for reprints may be sent to Amy Otis-Wilborn, Ph.D., Department of Exceptional Education, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Enderis Hall, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201.
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / School-Based Settings / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1992
Developing Oral Communication in Students With Hearing Impairments
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1992, Vol. 23, 71-77. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2301.71
History: Received June 22, 1990 , Accepted October 29, 1990
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1992, Vol. 23, 71-77. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2301.71
History: Received June 22, 1990; Accepted October 29, 1990

In the past 20 years, there have been significant changes in educational services for students with hearing impairments in the public schools. These changes include the enactment of the Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975, the provision of related services by speech-language pathologists and the transition from primarily oral instructional philosophies and practices to those of total communication. Policies and procedures for delivering instruction in oral communication to students with hearing impairments have accompanied these changes. This article presents the results of a survey completed by speech-language pathologists and teachers of hearing-impaired students to identify parameters of instruction for developing oral communication in hearing impaired students. Specifically examined were aspects of professional preparation, roles, and responsibilities of speech-language pathologists and teachers, and parameters of direct instruction. Based on the findings of this survey and knowledge regarding how students learn oral communication, recommendations for the implementation of collaboration and consultation models by speech-language pathologists, teachers, and audiologists are proposed.

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