Children With Normal Language Skills in Preschool Classrooms for Children With Language Impairments Differences in Modeling Styles Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1992
Children With Normal Language Skills in Preschool Classrooms for Children With Language Impairments
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amy L. Weiss, Ph.D.
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242
  • Monica Nakamura
    Project Head Start, Denver, CO
  • Requests for reprints may be sent to Amy L. Weiss, Ph.D., Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242.
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1992
Children With Normal Language Skills in Preschool Classrooms for Children With Language Impairments
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1992, Vol. 23, 64-70. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2301.64
History: Received February 1, 1990 , Accepted October 18, 1990
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1992, Vol. 23, 64-70. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2301.64
History: Received February 1, 1990; Accepted October 18, 1990

Three children with normally-developing language who served as peer models in a preschool classroom for language-impaired children were observed to evaluate their performance as language models. Data analyses focused on how much time each child spent alone, in activities with language-impaired classmates, with other models and/or adults, as well as how language was used by the models during conversations. Conversation samples were coded for assertiveness and responsiveness as per a taxonomy developed by Fey (1986) . Results indicated that although each of the model children had the prerequisite language competencies for modeling age-appropriate language behaviors, the amount of time each spent engaging language-impaired classmates in activities and conversation varied.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This study represents portions of an undergraduate honors project completed by the second author and directed by the first author at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Portions of this study were presented at the 1988 convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in Boston, Massachusetts. The authors gratefully acknowledge the assistance of Sheila Goetz, Director of the Child Language Center at the Department of Communication Disorders and Speech Science, University of Colorado, and J. Bruce Tomblin, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Iowa, for his helpful suggestions on early drafts of this paper.
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