Assessing the Use of Age-Equivalent Scores in Clinical Management Speech-language evaluation reports from many institutions present age-equivalent scores as the evidence for speech-language deficits. Yet, the value and interpretation of this measurement criterion requires clinical scrutiny. This article reviews the concept and derivation of age-equivalent scores and presents arguments against their use in case management decisions. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1992
Assessing the Use of Age-Equivalent Scores in Clinical Management
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carol W. Lawrence
    The University of Akron
  • Requests for reprints may be sent to Carol W. Lawrence, Ph.D., Department of Communicative Disorders, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-3001.
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1992
Assessing the Use of Age-Equivalent Scores in Clinical Management
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1992, Vol. 23, 6-8. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2301.06
History: Received August 27, 1990 , Accepted December 17, 1990
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1992, Vol. 23, 6-8. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2301.06
History: Received August 27, 1990; Accepted December 17, 1990

Speech-language evaluation reports from many institutions present age-equivalent scores as the evidence for speech-language deficits. Yet, the value and interpretation of this measurement criterion requires clinical scrutiny. This article reviews the concept and derivation of age-equivalent scores and presents arguments against their use in case management decisions.

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