Using Conventional Articulation Tests With Highly Unintelligible Children Identification and Programming Concerns Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1992
Using Conventional Articulation Tests With Highly Unintelligible Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Vicki Martin
    Mt. Airy Public Schools, NC
  • Requests for reprints may be sent to Pamela G. Garr-Nunn, Box 6961, Radford University, Radford, VA 24142.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1992
Using Conventional Articulation Tests With Highly Unintelligible Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1992, Vol. 23, 52-60. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2301.52
History: Received January 8, 1990 , Accepted October 1, 1990
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1992, Vol. 23, 52-60. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2301.52
History: Received January 8, 1990; Accepted October 1, 1990

This study explored whether or not standard administration and scoring of conventional articulation tests accurately identified children as phonologically disordered and whether or not information from these tests established severity level and programming needs. Results of standard scoring procedures from the Assessment of Phonological Processes-Revised, the Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation, the Photo Articulation Test, and the Weiss Comprehensive Articulation Test were compared for 20 phonologically impaired children. All tests identified the children as phonologically delayed/disordered, but the conventional tests failed to clearly and consistently differentiate varying severity levels. Conventional test results also showed limitations in error sensitivity, ease of computation for scoring procedures, and implications for remediation programming. The use of some type of rule-based analysis for phonologically impaired children is highly recommended.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This work was supported in part by a grant from the Radford University Foundation.
A shorter version of this paper was presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention, November 1988, in Boston, Massachusetts.
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