The Effectiveness of School-Based Computer Language Intervention With Severely Handicapped Children Fifty-two severely handicapped children were trained on communication skills using microprocessor technology. A graduate student in Communication Disorders provided interactive supervision during the training. One-way analyses of covariance indicated positive effect for the additional computer language training when compared to regular classroom training alone. Effects were strongest on a direct ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1992
The Effectiveness of School-Based Computer Language Intervention With Severely Handicapped Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Teris K. Schery, Ph.D.
    California State University-Los Angeles
  • Lisa C. O’Connor
    California State University-Los Angeles
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Teris K. Schery, Department of Communication Disorders, California State University, 5151 State University Drive, Los Angeles, CA, 90032.
Article Information
Special Populations / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1992
The Effectiveness of School-Based Computer Language Intervention With Severely Handicapped Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1992, Vol. 23, 43-47. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2301.43
History: Received May 29, 1990 , Accepted September 6, 1990
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1992, Vol. 23, 43-47. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2301.43
History: Received May 29, 1990; Accepted September 6, 1990

Fifty-two severely handicapped children were trained on communication skills using microprocessor technology. A graduate student in Communication Disorders provided interactive supervision during the training. One-way analyses of covariance indicated positive effect for the additional computer language training when compared to regular classroom training alone. Effects were strongest on a direct criterion-referenced measure of the vocabulary taught. A cluster of more general language measures taken by the researchers, classroom teachers, and parents also indicated benefit to the computer enhancement condition. Additionally, the effect of this training was discernible on teacher and parent measures of social interaction skills.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This research was funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Technology Research for the Handicapped (G008730283). The authors wish to thank the teachers, staff, and administrators of the Stoneman and East San Gabriel Valley Units of the Special Education Division of the Los Angeles County Superintendent of Schools Office for their assistance and support in carrying out this project.
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