Parent-Child Comparative Analysis A Criterion-Referenced Method for the Nondiscriminatory Assessment of a Child Who Spoke a Relatively Uncommon Dialect of English Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1992
Parent-Child Comparative Analysis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sandra L. Terrell, Ph.D.
    University of North Texas, Denton, Texas
  • Karen Arensberg
    Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph Health Unit, Guelph, Ontario
  • Melinda Rosa
    Pojoaque Valley Schools, Pojoaque, New Mexico
  • Requests for reprints may be sent to Sandra L. Terrell, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203-5008
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Normal Language Processing / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1992
Parent-Child Comparative Analysis
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1992, Vol. 23, 34-42. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2301.34
History: Received February 16, 1990 , Accepted April 16, 1990
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1992, Vol. 23, 34-42. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2301.34
History: Received February 16, 1990; Accepted April 16, 1990

This paper describes a criterion-referenced method that was developed to assess the speech and language of a girl, age 4 years, 8 months, whose parents spoke English that was greatly influenced by their native Nigerian language. The method, called Parent-Child Comparative Analysis (PCCA), consisted of administering an identical battery of tests to both father and child and then interpreting the child’s performance in relation to that of the father’s. Normal age-level expectations for various linguistic structures also influenced interpretation. Results indicated that the child’s articulation skills were mildly delayed for her age and dialect and that she had a moderate disorder in several language areas. Suggestions and limitations of the PCCA are provided for clinicians who may wish to use this method for assessing persons who speak an uncommon or unfamiliar dialect of English and/or when information about the normal patterns of a dialect is unavailable.

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