The Utility of School-Age Narrative Microstructure Indices: INMIS and the Proportion of Restricted Utterances Purpose This research investigated the applicability of the index of narrative microstructure (INMIS; L. M. Justice et al., 2006) system for narratives that were elicited through a wordless picture book context. In addition, the viability of an alternative, simpler metric was explored. Method Narrative transcripts using the Frog, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2009
The Utility of School-Age Narrative Microstructure Indices: INMIS and the Proportion of Restricted Utterances
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • LaVae M. Hoffman
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville
  • Contact author: LaVae M. Hoffman, University of Virginia, Curry School of Education, Communication Disorders Program and Applied Developmental Sciences Program, 2205 Fontaine Avenue, Suite 202, Charlottesville, VA 22908. E-mail: lmh3f@virginia.edu.
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2009
The Utility of School-Age Narrative Microstructure Indices: INMIS and the Proportion of Restricted Utterances
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2009, Vol. 40, 365-375. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2009/08-0017)
History: Received February 27, 2008 , Revised July 17, 2008 , Accepted November 3, 2008
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2009, Vol. 40, 365-375. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2009/08-0017)
History: Received February 27, 2008; Revised July 17, 2008; Accepted November 3, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

Purpose This research investigated the applicability of the index of narrative microstructure (INMIS; L. M. Justice et al., 2006) system for narratives that were elicited through a wordless picture book context. In addition, the viability of an alternative, simpler metric was explored.

Method Narrative transcripts using the Frog, Where Are You? (M. Mayer, 1969) wordless picture book with 48 school-age children with and without language impairment were analyzed using the INMIS productivity and complexity indices and a proportion of restricted utterances metric. Roy-Bargmann stepdown F calculations, effect sizes, confidence intervals, and positive and negative likelihood ratios were analyzed to examine the statistical and clinical significance of each narrative metric.

Results The INMIS complexity metric and the proportion of restricted utterances metric yielded statistically significant differences between the two language ability groups and are likely to have good potential as research and clinical tools within the wordless picture book narrative elicitation context. The INMIS productivity metric did not differentiate between the language groups.

Conclusion The results support the use of the INMIS complexity metric in a wordless picture book elicitation context and introduce an alternative microstructure analysis metric, the proportion of restricted utterances, which uses a logically transparent scale and may meet research and clinical needs without requiring the use of specialized software or complex calculations.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
Gratitude is extended to Sarah M. Baker and Ashley Robinson, doctoral students at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, for their assistance with interrater reliability and data entry. A similar note of appreciation is extended to Randall R. Robey at the University of Virginia for his support and encouragement during the final data analyses and manuscript preparation.
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