Integrated Morphological Awareness Intervention as a Tool for Improving Literacy Purpose This study evaluated the effects of an intervention program aimed to improve reading and spelling ability through instruction in morphological awareness together with other forms of linguistic awareness, including knowledge of phonology, orthography, syntax, and semantics. Method Sixteen children aged between 8;07 (years;months) and 11;01 who demonstrated ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   July 01, 2009
Integrated Morphological Awareness Intervention as a Tool for Improving Literacy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cecilia Kirk
    University of Canterbury, New Zealand and University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Gail T. Gillon
    University of Canterbury, New Zealand
  • Contact author: Cecilia Kirk, Department of Special Education and Clinical Services, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403. E-mail: ceciliak@uoregon.edu.
Article Information
Development / Normal Language Processing / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum   |   July 01, 2009
Integrated Morphological Awareness Intervention as a Tool for Improving Literacy
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2009, Vol. 40, 341-351. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2008/08-0009)
History: Received January 31, 2008 , Revised August 6, 2008 , Accepted September 10, 2008
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2009, Vol. 40, 341-351. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2008/08-0009)
History: Received January 31, 2008; Revised August 6, 2008; Accepted September 10, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 28

Purpose This study evaluated the effects of an intervention program aimed to improve reading and spelling ability through instruction in morphological awareness together with other forms of linguistic awareness, including knowledge of phonology, orthography, syntax, and semantics.

Method Sixteen children aged between 8;07 (years;months) and 11;01 who demonstrated specific spelling difficulties were randomly assigned to either an experimental or a control group. Participants received an average of 19.4 sessions of intervention that focused on increasing awareness of the morphological structure of words, with particular attention to the orthographic rules that apply when suffixes are added to the base word.

Results Participants in the experimental group made significantly greater gains in reading and spelling accuracy than those in the control group on both experimental and standardized measures of reading and spelling. The results also show that participants were able to generalize to new words what they had learned in the intervention sessions.

Conclusion Practitioners should consider the likely benefits of literacy intervention that focuses on developing morphological awareness in conjunction with other types of linguistic awareness.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors would like to thank the children and families who participated so willingly in the research study. This study was financially supported by a postdoctoral fellowship from the New Zealand Foundation for Research, Science, and Technology that was awarded to the first author.
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