A Survey of University Professors Teaching Speech Sound Disorders: Nonspeech Oral Motor Exercises and Other Topics Purpose The purpose of this article was to obtain and organize information from instructors who teach course work on the subject of children’s speech sound disorders (SSD) regarding their use of teaching resources, involvement in students' clinical practica, and intervention approaches presented to students. Instructors also reported if they taught ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 2009
A Survey of University Professors Teaching Speech Sound Disorders: Nonspeech Oral Motor Exercises and Other Topics
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Maggie M. Watson
    University of Wisconsin–Stevens Point
  • Gregory L. Lof
    MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
  • Contact author: Maggie M. Watson, University of Wisconsin–Stevens Point, Communicative Disorders, 1901 4th Avenue, Stevens Point, WI 54481. E-mail: maggie.watson@uwsp.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 2009
A Survey of University Professors Teaching Speech Sound Disorders: Nonspeech Oral Motor Exercises and Other Topics
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2009, Vol. 40, 256-270. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2009/08-0021)
History: Received February 29, 2008 , Revised June 9, 2008 , Accepted November 2, 2008
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2009, Vol. 40, 256-270. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2009/08-0021)
History: Received February 29, 2008; Revised June 9, 2008; Accepted November 2, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose The purpose of this article was to obtain and organize information from instructors who teach course work on the subject of children’s speech sound disorders (SSD) regarding their use of teaching resources, involvement in students' clinical practica, and intervention approaches presented to students. Instructors also reported if they taught students to use nonspeech oral motor exercises (NSOMEs) to remediate children’s SSD.

Method A questionnaire was mailed to 236 speech-language pathology preprofessional programs in the United States that are accredited by the Council of Academic Accreditation.

Results Ninety-one questionnaires (39%) were returned. Participants reported that they provided their students with information on a variety of intervention approaches for SSD and typically used professional journals and textbooks for current information. Sixty-eight (75%) paticipants reported that they did not teach their students to use NSOMEs. Forty-seven (52%) of the instructors supervised students in clinical practicum serving children with SSD and perceived that academic course work and practicum experiences influenced their students' implementation of intervention for children with SSD.

Conclusion The instructors reported that they taught their students a variety of intervention techniques for children with SSD, although most did not teach the use of NSOMEs. These results contrast with previous research indicating that many speech-language pathologists use NSOMEs to improve children’s speech (G.L. Lof & M.M. Watson, 2008).

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This study was supported by grants from the University of Wisconsin–Stevens Point Student Research Fund, College of Professional Studies, and Department of Communicative Disorders.
We would like to thank Nathan Wetzel for his help with some of the statistical analyses.
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