Integrating American Indian/Alaska Native Culture Into Shared Storybook Intervention Purpose The purpose of this clinical exchange is to provide information for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) so they will be able to provide culturally responsive intervention for young children of American Indian and Alaska Native heritage. The focus is on a particular strategy–the integration of culturally based stories into shared storybook ... Clinical Exchange
Clinical Exchange  |   October 01, 2008
Integrating American Indian/Alaska Native Culture Into Shared Storybook Intervention
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ella Inglebret
    Washington State University, Pullman
  • Carla Jones
    Washington State University, Pullman
  • D. Michael Pavel
    Washington State University, Pullman
  • Contact author: Ella Inglebret, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Washington State University, P.O. Box 642420, Pullman, WA 99164-2420. E-mail: einglebret@wsu.edu.
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Clinical Exchange: Integrating American Indian/Alaska Native Culture Into Shared Storybook Intervention
Clinical Exchange   |   October 01, 2008
Integrating American Indian/Alaska Native Culture Into Shared Storybook Intervention
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2008, Vol. 39, 521-527. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2008/07-0051)
History: Received July 19, 2007 , Accepted December 4, 2007
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2008, Vol. 39, 521-527. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2008/07-0051)
History: Received July 19, 2007; Accepted December 4, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 8

Purpose The purpose of this clinical exchange is to provide information for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) so they will be able to provide culturally responsive intervention for young children of American Indian and Alaska Native heritage. The focus is on a particular strategy–the integration of culturally based stories into shared storybook intervention.

Method The use of culturally based stories is presented as it relates to sociocultural theory and the expressed priority of Native peoples to revitalize their cultural teaching and learning practices, inclusive of storytelling. Strategies are presented that SLPs can follow in preparing for the use of culturally based stories, as well as in ensuring that the stories that are selected for use are authentic and appropriate for the children involved. The strategies discussed represent the collaborative efforts of Native and non-Native professionals to link a review of pertinent scholarly literature with ancestral knowledge that is derived from tribal elders and tradition bearers of the Southern Puget Salish peoples. The article concludes by illustrating the application of these strategies to a program involving young children of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

Conclusion SLPs can integrate culturally based stories into their language and literacy intervention to encourage American Indian and Alaska Native children.

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