The Effect of Classroom Amplification on the Signal-to-Noise Ratio in Classrooms While Class Is in Session Purpose The purpose of this study was to measure the signal-to-noise ratios in classrooms while class was in session and students were interacting with the teacher and each other. Method Measurements of noise and reverberation were collected for 5 different classrooms in 3 different schools while class was ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2008
The Effect of Classroom Amplification on the Signal-to-Noise Ratio in Classrooms While Class Is in Session
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeffery B. Larsen
    Utah State University, Logan
  • James C. Blair
    Utah State University, Logan
  • Contact author: Jeffery B. Larsen, COMDDE Department, Utah State University, 1000 Old Main Hill, UMC 1000, Logan, UT 84322-1000. E-mail: Jeffery.larsen@usu.edu.
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2008
The Effect of Classroom Amplification on the Signal-to-Noise Ratio in Classrooms While Class Is in Session
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2008, Vol. 39, 451-460. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2008/07-0032)
History: Received May 9, 2007 , Revised September 4, 2007 , Accepted December 20, 2007
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2008, Vol. 39, 451-460. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2008/07-0032)
History: Received May 9, 2007; Revised September 4, 2007; Accepted December 20, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 25

Purpose The purpose of this study was to measure the signal-to-noise ratios in classrooms while class was in session and students were interacting with the teacher and each other.

Method Measurements of noise and reverberation were collected for 5 different classrooms in 3 different schools while class was in session. Activities taking place during the measurements were recorded to compare with sound level measures. The use of infrared classroom amplification was compared with no amplification.

Results/Conclusion The results revealed that when classroom amplification was used, students heard the teacher’s voice at a level that was an average of 13 dB above the noise floor as compared to an average of +2 dB above the noise floor without amplification.

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