The Publication Process: An Olympic Feat As I write this letter, it is Day 7 of the Olympics. I am not ashamed to say that I am an Olympics fanatic. I love watching the competitions. In just 1 week, there have been both highs and lows to the events. An obvious high has been the ... Editorial
Editorial  |   October 01, 2008
The Publication Process: An Olympic Feat
 
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Editorial
Editorial   |   October 01, 2008
The Publication Process: An Olympic Feat
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2008, Vol. 39, 439. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2008/ed-04)
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2008, Vol. 39, 439. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2008/ed-04)
As I write this letter, it is Day 7 of the Olympics. I am not ashamed to say that I am an Olympics fanatic. I love watching the competitions. In just 1 week, there have been both highs and lows to the events. An obvious high has been the multiple gold medals won by Michael Phelps. With each swimming event, he not only wins, but also sets a new world record. Perhaps most importantly, he appears to be levelheaded about his wins, accepting each win graciously and with good sportsmanship. Even though there seems to be great pressure from all of the media coverage, Phelps appears to enter each event without a sense of cockiness or guarantee that he will win. In other words, he appears to give his all with each attempt. The same can be said for the women’s gymnastics team. Though they stumbled on several rounds, resulting in a silver versus a gold medal, they lauded each others' contributions, showed great sportsmanship, and rejoiced in their second-place finish.
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