A Nationwide Survey of Nonspeech Oral Motor Exercise Use: Implications for Evidence-Based Practice PurposeA nationwide survey was conducted to determine if speech-language pathologists (SLPs) use nonspeech oral motor exercises (NSOMEs) to address children’s speech sound problems. For those SLPs who used NSOMEs, the survey also identified (a) the types of NSOMEs used by the SLPs, (b) the SLPs' underlying beliefs about why they ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   July 2008
A Nationwide Survey of Nonspeech Oral Motor Exercise Use: Implications for Evidence-Based Practice
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gregory L. Lof
    MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
  • Maggie M. Watson
    University of Wisconsin–Stevens Point
  • Contact author: Gregory L. Lof, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Charleston Navy Yard, 36 First Avenue, Boston, MA 02129-4557. E-mail: glof@mghihp.edu.
  • © 2008 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum   |   July 2008
A Nationwide Survey of Nonspeech Oral Motor Exercise Use: Implications for Evidence-Based Practice
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2008, Vol. 39, 392-407. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2008/037)
History: Received September 30, 2005 , Accepted January 3, 2007
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2008, Vol. 39, 392-407. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2008/037)
History: Received September 30, 2005; Accepted January 3, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 24

PurposeA nationwide survey was conducted to determine if speech-language pathologists (SLPs) use nonspeech oral motor exercises (NSOMEs) to address children’s speech sound problems. For those SLPs who used NSOMEs, the survey also identified (a) the types of NSOMEs used by the SLPs, (b) the SLPs' underlying beliefs about why they use NSOMEs, (c) clinicians' training for these exercises, (d) the application of NSOMEs across various clinical populations, and (e) specific tasks/procedures/tools that are used for intervention.

MethodA total of 2,000 surveys were mailed to a randomly selected subgroup of SLPs, obtained from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) membership roster, who self-identified that they worked in various settings with children who have speech sound problems. The questions required answers that used both a forced choice and Likert-type scales.

ResultsThe response rate was 27.5% (537 out of 2,000). Of these respondents, 85% reported using NSOMEs to deal with children’s speech sound production problems. Those SLPs reported that the research literature supports the use of NSOMEs, and that they learned to use these techniques from continuing education events. They also stated that NSOMEs can help improve the speech of children from disparate etiologies, and “warming up” and strengthening the articulators are important components of speech sound therapy.

ConclusionThere are theoretical and research data that challenge both the use of NSOMEs and the efficacy of such exercises in resolving speech sound problems. SLPs need to follow the concepts of evidence-based practice in order to determine if these exercises are actually effective in bringing about changes in speech productions.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
This research was partially supported by a grant from the University Personnel Development Committee of the University of Wisconsin–Stevens Point.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access