Test-Retest Reliability Another Evaluation of the Test of Problem Solving Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   October 01, 1991
Test-Retest Reliability
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elizabeth Skarakis-Doyle
    School of Human Communication Disorders Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • Carol Anne Mallet
    School of Human Communication Disorders Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia, Canada
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   October 01, 1991
Test-Retest Reliability
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1991, Vol. 22, 278-279. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2204.278
History: Received July 7, 1990 , Accepted October 29, 1990
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1991, Vol. 22, 278-279. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2204.278
History: Received July 7, 1990; Accepted October 29, 1990
In a recent study, Bernhardt (1990)  challenged the content validity of the Test of Problem Solving (TOPS). As a follow-up to that study, the purpose of this correspondence is to raise additional questions about the adequacy of the TOPS as an assessment tool. Because the only reliability data provided by the authors of the TOPS (Zachman, Jorgensen, Huisingh, & Barrett, 1984) are a measure of its internal consistency (split-half reliability coefficient), this letter focuses upon the issue of test-retest reliability.
The TOPS was administered to 16 children in Grades 1 through 6, ranging in age from 6:0 to 11:8 (years:months). The test was administered by the second author on two separate occasions, 8 weeks apart (Salvia & Ysseldyke, 1988). Children were informed that they were helping the examiner with a project in which she would ask them questions and that she would return in several months to ask the questions again. All responses were audiotape recorded, orthographically transcribed, and scored by the examining author according to the procedures delineated in the administration manual for the TOPS (Zachman et al., 1984). A Pearson Product-Moment correlation with the effect of grade level partialled out was then calculated for the total test raw scores obtained during both administration times. Because the TOPS requires skills that are influenced by the educational process such as inferencing, and these skills receive varying degrees of emphasis at different grade levels in a school curriculum, grade rather than age was partialled out.
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