When to Recommend Intervention The first treatment efficacy decision that faces the clinician is deciding when a child with language impairments can benefit from intervention. This article reviews the critical issues that influence this decision and recommends a data-based approach to answering the question. Three procedures (profiling, dynamic assessment, and tracking/monitoring) are recommended as ... Clinical Forum
EDITOR'S AWARD
Clinical Forum  |   October 01, 1991
When to Recommend Intervention
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lesley B. Olswang, Ph. D.
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Barbara A. Bain
    Idaho State University, Pocatello
  • Requests for reprints may be sent to Lesley B. Olswang, Speech & Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Mail Stop JG 15, Seattle, WA 98195.
Article Information
Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Forum: Treatment Efficacy
Clinical Forum   |   October 01, 1991
When to Recommend Intervention
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1991, Vol. 22, 255-263. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2204.255
History: Received July 9, 1990 , Accepted November 26, 1990
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1991, Vol. 22, 255-263. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2204.255
History: Received July 9, 1990; Accepted November 26, 1990

The first treatment efficacy decision that faces the clinician is deciding when a child with language impairments can benefit from intervention. This article reviews the critical issues that influence this decision and recommends a data-based approach to answering the question. Three procedures (profiling, dynamic assessment, and tracking/monitoring) are recommended as the tools for helping speech-language pathologists make informed decisions about when children might best benefit from intervention.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This research was supported in part by the National Institutes of Health, National Institutes of Deafness and other Communication Disorders, Grant #R29-DC00431, Predicting the Benefits of Treatment. The authors wish to express their appreciation to Arlene Chaussee for her preparation of this manuscript, and to Alan Kamhi and Marc Fey for their helpful comments in the completion of this article.
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