Morphological Development and Writing Ability in Children and Adults The purpose of this study was to investigate morphological knowledge in spoken language and its relationship to written representation of morphemes by normally achieving second graders, language-learning disabled children, and adults with literacy problems. Research dealing with the written expression of populations with language-learning difficulties has consistently indicated that these ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1991
Morphological Development and Writing Ability in Children and Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hyla Rubin
    Graduate Department of Speech Pathology, University of Toronto
  • Patricia A. Patterson
    Peel Memorial Hospital, Mississauga, Ontario
  • Miriam Kantor
    Peel Board of Education, Mississauga, Ontario
  • Requests for reprints may be sent to: Hyla Rubin, Graduate Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, 88 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1L4.
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1991
Morphological Development and Writing Ability in Children and Adults
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1991, Vol. 22, 228-235. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2204.228
History: Received July 31, 1990 , Accepted August 2, 1990
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1991, Vol. 22, 228-235. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2204.228
History: Received July 31, 1990; Accepted August 2, 1990

The purpose of this study was to investigate morphological knowledge in spoken language and its relationship to written representation of morphemes by normally achieving second graders, language-learning disabled children, and adults with literacy problems. Research dealing with the written expression of populations with language-learning difficulties has consistently indicated that these populations tend to make morphemic errors when spelling words. If a deficit in morphological knowledge is an underlying factor, then these individuals might also be expected to perform poorly on tasks that require them to apply morphological rules in spoken language (an implicit level of morphological knowledge) or to analyze the morphemic structure of spoken words (an explicit level of morphological knowledge). Analyses found both these levels of morphological knowledge to be highly related to morpheme use in written language samples, and suggest that morphological knowledge does not develop solely as a function of maturation or exposure to language. Implications of these findings for assessment and intervention are addressed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This research was funded by Grant A2008 from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. We would like to thank the students, parents, and teachers of the Durham Board of Education, as well as the members of the Speech-Language Pathology Department, for their assistance. Our thanks also to Mary Louise Steinberg, director of the Remedial Reading Centre, for her assistance, and to the adult subjects who participated in our study.
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