Selective Auditory Attention and Children With Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Effects of Repeated Measurement With and Without Methylphenidate Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1991
Selective Auditory Attention and Children With Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan D. Dalebout
    Western Michigan University-Kalamazoo
  • Nickola W. Nelson
    Western Michigan University-Kalamazoo
  • Paul J. Hletko
    Borgess Medical Center, Kalamazoo
  • Barbara Frentheway
    Borgess Medical Center, Kalamazoo
  • Requests for reprints may be sent to Susan D. Dalebout, MA, Division of Speech and Hearing Science, Ohio State University, 110 Pressey Hall, 1070 Carmack Rd., Columbus, OH 43210.
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1991
Selective Auditory Attention and Children With Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1991, Vol. 22, 219-227. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2204.219
History: Received August 4, 1988 , Accepted August 6, 1990
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1991, Vol. 22, 219-227. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2204.219
History: Received August 4, 1988; Accepted August 6, 1990

The Selective Auditory Attention Test (SAAT) was given to children diagnosed as having Attention-Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) twice: after the administration of methylphenidate, and after the administration of a placebo. Children in the control group were tested twice, but without drugs or placebos. Results revealed no simple drug effect, but a strong order effect. The implications of using the SAAT as a predictor of auditory attention deficits and concerns regarding its test-retest reliability are discussed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors wish to express appreciation to Peninnah Miller, Director of the Center for Statistical Services, Western Michigan University, who served as statistical consultant for the study, and also to Mira Brooks, Ruth Schaefer, and Carol Erickson, graduate student clinicians who assisted with data collection.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access