Four Grammatic Completion Measures of Language Ability Sixty normally hearing children from preschool, kindergarten, or second grade each received four commonly used grammatic completion measures: The Berry-Talbott Developmental Guide to Comprehension of Grammar, the Grammatic Closure subtest of the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities, the Grammatic Completion subtest of the Test of Language Development-Primary, and the Morphological ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1991
Four Grammatic Completion Measures of Language Ability
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ron W. Channell
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Charlene T. Ford
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Requests for reprints may be sent to Ron W. Channell, Audiology & Speech-Language Pathology, 128 TLRB-BYU, Provo, UT 84602.
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / School-Based Settings / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1991
Four Grammatic Completion Measures of Language Ability
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1991, Vol. 22, 211-218. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2204.211
History: Received October 12, 1989 , Accepted July 9, 1990
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1991, Vol. 22, 211-218. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2204.211
History: Received October 12, 1989; Accepted July 9, 1990

Sixty normally hearing children from preschool, kindergarten, or second grade each received four commonly used grammatic completion measures: The Berry-Talbott Developmental Guide to Comprehension of Grammar, the Grammatic Closure subtest of the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities, the Grammatic Completion subtest of the Test of Language Development-Primary, and the Morphological Rules section of the Bankson Language Screening Text. Moderately high overall correlations were found among the four measures. Older children scored higher than younger children. Performance of females and males was similar. Patterns of association among tests remained stable even when effects of age were removed using partial correlations or when standard scores were examined. Children missed the highest proportion of items on the Berry-Talbott test and the lowest proportion of items on the Bankson Screening Test.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
We acknowledge the cooperation of teachers, administrators, and parents in the Davis County (Utah) School District, specifically Centerville Elementary, in obtaining children to serve as subjects. We also appreciate the assistance of Donna W. Tanner in evaluating data reliability.
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