A Comparison of Speech-Language Pathologists in Rural and Urban School Districts in the State of Washington Questionnaires were sent to speech-language pathologists who work in rural and urban school districts in the state of Washington in order to compare employment in these environments. Significant differences were found in program development, travel time, contact with peers, number of schools served, plans for changing job settings, years of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1991
A Comparison of Speech-Language Pathologists in Rural and Urban School Districts in the State of Washington
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Suzy Hall
    Washington State University, Spokane
  • Lynn B. Larrigan
    Washington State University, Spokane
  • Charles L. Madison
    Washington State University, Spokane
  • Requests for reprints may be sent to Lynn Larrigan, Washington State University, W. 601 First Avenue, Spokane, WA 99204-0339.
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1991
A Comparison of Speech-Language Pathologists in Rural and Urban School Districts in the State of Washington
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1991, Vol. 22, 204-210. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2204.204
History: Received March 1, 1990 , Accepted June 11, 1990
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1991, Vol. 22, 204-210. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2204.204
History: Received March 1, 1990; Accepted June 11, 1990

Questionnaires were sent to speech-language pathologists who work in rural and urban school districts in the state of Washington in order to compare employment in these environments. Significant differences were found in program development, travel time, contact with peers, number of schools served, plans for changing job settings, years of experience, years of employment at their current positions, number of hours spent in continuing education, and type of continuing education activities attended. Similarities were found in place of residence, time spent in direct services, hours of inservice provided, contact with supervisors, number of students served, job satisfaction and preservice preparation. These results are discussed in relation to service delivery, retention, and job satisfaction.

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