A Multivariate Analysis of the Job Satisfaction of Public School Speech-Language Pathologists This study was designed to structure and identify variables related to the job satisfaction of public school speech-language pathologists. A total of 281 clinicians nationwide rated their degree of job satisfaction on 34 critical variables. Factor analysis yielded three distinct dimensions of satisfaction: supervision, workload, and co-workers. Variables from each ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1991
A Multivariate Analysis of the Job Satisfaction of Public School Speech-Language Pathologists
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carolyn Pezzei
    Speech-Language Pathologist, Newark, NJ
  • Albert R. Oratio
    William Paterson College, Wayne, NJ
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Albert R. Oratio, Department of Communciation Disorders, William Paterson College, Wayne, NJ 07470.
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1991
A Multivariate Analysis of the Job Satisfaction of Public School Speech-Language Pathologists
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1991, Vol. 22, 139-146. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2203.139
History: Received April 23, 1990 , Accepted July 9, 1990
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1991, Vol. 22, 139-146. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2203.139
History: Received April 23, 1990; Accepted July 9, 1990

This study was designed to structure and identify variables related to the job satisfaction of public school speech-language pathologists. A total of 281 clinicians nationwide rated their degree of job satisfaction on 34 critical variables. Factor analysis yielded three distinct dimensions of satisfaction: supervision, workload, and co-workers. Variables from each of these dimensions, and from the clinicians’ backgrounds and job settings, were found to correlate most significantly with their overall levels of job satisfaction. A preliminary model for predicting job satisfaction is proposed. Implications for clinicians seeking employment in the public schools, as well as for those currently employed, are discussed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Grateful appreciation is extended to all of the public school clinicians who participated in this study, and to Carole Gelfer for her careful critique of this research. This study was based on a master’s thesis, completed in the Department of Communication Disorders at William Paterson College by the first author.
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