Behavior Problems and the Power Relationship Speech-language pathologists frequently deal with children whose behavior problems interfere with progress in therapy. In some cases, the child’s reaction to the authority relationships within the clinical setting may be a contributing factor. Procedures that clinicians may use to modify this factor are discussed. ... Clinical Exchange
Clinical Exchange  |   April 01, 1991
Behavior Problems and the Power Relationship
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alta R. Brooks
    Southwest Texas State University, San Marcos
Article Information
Development / Professional Issues & Training / Normal Language Processing / Clinical Exchange
Clinical Exchange   |   April 01, 1991
Behavior Problems and the Power Relationship
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1991, Vol. 22, 89-91. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2202.89
History: Received February 5, 1990 , Accepted May 3, 1990
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1991, Vol. 22, 89-91. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2202.89
History: Received February 5, 1990; Accepted May 3, 1990

Speech-language pathologists frequently deal with children whose behavior problems interfere with progress in therapy. In some cases, the child’s reaction to the authority relationships within the clinical setting may be a contributing factor. Procedures that clinicians may use to modify this factor are discussed.

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