Specific Language Impairment as a Clinical Category Many children are diagnosed as "specifically language-impaired" principally on the basis of their low scores relative to the norm on language measures. Yet it is often assumed that such children must suffer from a subtle disruption or defect in some peripheral or central mechanism that is involved in language learning. ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   April 01, 1991
Specific Language Impairment as a Clinical Category
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laurence B. Leonard, Ph.D.
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Requests for reprints may be sent to Laurence B. Leonard, Ph.D., Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Heavilon Hall, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Forum: Specific Language Impairment as a Clinical Category
Clinical Forum   |   April 01, 1991
Specific Language Impairment as a Clinical Category
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1991, Vol. 22, 66-68. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2202.66
History: Received December 14, 1989 , Accepted February 12, 1990
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1991, Vol. 22, 66-68. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2202.66
History: Received December 14, 1989; Accepted February 12, 1990

Many children are diagnosed as "specifically language-impaired" principally on the basis of their low scores relative to the norm on language measures. Yet it is often assumed that such children must suffer from a subtle disruption or defect in some peripheral or central mechanism that is involved in language learning. In this paper, an alternative view is offered: Many of these children may simply be limited in language ability in much the same way that others may be poor in musical, spatial, or bodily kinesthetic abilities.

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