The Identification of Vowel Errors Using Traditional Articulation or Phonological Process Test Stimuli The stimulus items from five commonly used assessment tools were examined to determine the number of occurrences of each English vowel and diphthong in a variety of contexts. Results indicated that the overall number of occurrences varied greatly from vowel to vowel and from test to test. In addition, the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1991
The Identification of Vowel Errors Using Traditional Articulation or Phonological Process Test Stimuli
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen E. Pollock, Ph.D.
    Memphis State University
  • Requests for reprints may be sent to Karen E. Pollock, Ph.D., Memphis Speech and Hearing Center, Memphis State University, 807 Jefferson Ave., Memphis, TN 38105.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1991
The Identification of Vowel Errors Using Traditional Articulation or Phonological Process Test Stimuli
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1991, Vol. 22, 39-50. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2202.39
History: Received October 2, 1989 , Accepted May 14, 1990
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1991, Vol. 22, 39-50. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2202.39
History: Received October 2, 1989; Accepted May 14, 1990

The stimulus items from five commonly used assessment tools were examined to determine the number of occurrences of each English vowel and diphthong in a variety of contexts. Results indicated that the overall number of occurrences varied greatly from vowel to vowel and from test to test. In addition, the distribution of vowels across contexts was not balanced in any of the tests examined. The suitability of such stimuli for analyzing vowel errors is discussed in light of these results. Suggestions are provided for supplementing tests with additional stimulus words in order to obtain an adequate sample for vowel analysis. The suggested procedures are illustrated with data from one phonologically disordered client exhibiting vowel errors.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access