Clinical Forum  |   April 2008
Establishing a Public School Dysphagia Program: A Model for Administration and Service Provision
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Emily M. Homer
    St. Tammany Parish Schools, Covington, LA
  • Contact author: Emily M. Homer, 408 East 16th Avenue, Covington, LA 70433. E-mail: emily.homer@sptsb.org.
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / School-Based Settings / Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum   |   April 2008
Establishing a Public School Dysphagia Program: A Model for Administration and Service Provision
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools April 2008, Vol.39, 177-191. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2008/018)
History: Accepted 11 Jun 2007 , Received 13 Jun 2006
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools April 2008, Vol.39, 177-191. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2008/018)
History: Accepted 11 Jun 2007 , Received 13 Jun 2006

Purpose: Many school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are hampered in participating in managing children with dysphagia by their school systems' lack of supportive policies and procedures. A need exists to better define the dysphagia-trained SLP’s role and clarify the district’s responsibility. The purpose of this article is to address the critical administrative issues and administrative components surrounding dysphagia in the schools and to offer the SLP some solutions to these problems.

Method: A narrative review of the relevant literature addresses the following questions that are important for administrative planning and implementation of programs for students with dysphagia in the schools: (a) Should school systems assume responsibility for working with students with dysphagia? (b) Why is a system-supported procedure recommended? (c) What service delivery models can a system use to serve students with dysphagia? (d) What components should be included in a dysphagia procedure?

Conclusion: SLPs should be proactive in providing dysphagia services to students in the schools. A procedure that is adopted by a school system for all of its employees to follow will offer direction and guidance. This system-supported procedure may provide assurance that dysphagia services are being provided in a professionally acceptable manner. Ongoing staff development and training is essential. A system can implement dysphagia services using existing staff, when possible, and policies and procedures that have been approved by the system.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access

Related Articles

Avoiding Disputes in School-Based Management of Students With Dysphagia: Five Key Strategies
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia) October 2009, Vol.18, 97-102. doi:10.1044/sasd18.3.97
Serving Students With Dysphagia in the Schools? Educational Preparation Is Essential!
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools January 2000, Vol.31, 76-78. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3101.76
Legal and Financial Issues Associated With Providing Services in Schools to Children With Swallowing and Feeding Disorders
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools April 2008, Vol.39, 160-166. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2008/016)
Issues of Management of Swallowing and Feeding Disorders in the School Setting
SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia) October 2009, Vol.18, 80-85. doi:10.1044/sasd18.3.80
SIGs Welcome New Coordinating Committee Members
The ASHA Leader October 2013, Vol.18, 62. doi:10.1044/leader.AN14.18102013.62