Attitudes of Fourth and Sixth Graders Toward Peers With Mild Articulation Disorders This study examined attitudes of fourth and sixth graders toward peers with and without mild articulatory errors. A video-tape was developed with the following peer speakers: a boy with no errors, a girl with no errors, a boy with /r/ errors, a girl with /r/ errors, a boy with /s/ ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1991
Attitudes of Fourth and Sixth Graders Toward Peers With Mild Articulation Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barbara J. Crowe Hall
    Requests for reprints may be sent to Barbara J. Crowe Hall, 520 N. Monroe St., Williamsport, IN 47993.
  • Barbara J. Crowe Hall is currently affiliated with the Metropolitan School District of Warren County, Williamsport, IN 47993.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1991
Attitudes of Fourth and Sixth Graders Toward Peers With Mild Articulation Disorders
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1991, Vol. 22, 334-340. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2201.334
History: Received July 24, 1989 , Accepted February 19, 1990
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1991, Vol. 22, 334-340. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2201.334
History: Received July 24, 1989; Accepted February 19, 1990

This study examined attitudes of fourth and sixth graders toward peers with and without mild articulatory errors. A video-tape was developed with the following peer speakers: a boy with no errors, a girl with no errors, a boy with /r/ errors, a girl with /r/ errors, a boy with /s/ and /z/ errors, and a girl with /s/ and /z/ errors. This videotape was shown to 348 fourth and sixth graders. Attitudes toward speaking ability, the speaker as a peer, and what the speaker would be like as a teenager were measured through the use of semantic differential instruments. Significantly more negative attitudes were found toward the peers who exhibited articulatory errors. Implications for school district policies were discussed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The author expresses the deepest appreciation to Edward J. Hardick for his support during this study. Dr. Hardick’s unexpected death made the completion of this paper a bittersweet experience.
The author would also like to thank Roy A. Koenigsknecht, Herbert J. Oyer, Wayne A. Secord, Jerry Johnson, and Larry E. Miller for their guidance, Claude Lambert for his technical assistance, the statistical laboratories of the Department of Statistics and the Department of Psychology at The Ohio State University for their review of the statistical design and analysis, and the Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools reviewers.
The following central Ohio school districts are also recognized for their cooperation: Columbus Public Schools, Upper Arlington City School District, Groveport Madison Local Schools, Westerville City Schools, Marysville Exempted Village Schools, Newark City School District, Hamilton Local School District, South-Western City Schools, and Grandview Heights Public Schools.
This study was supported in part by a Graduate Student Alumni Research Award granted under the administration of The Graduate School of The Ohio State University.
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