Training Teachers to Use Naturalistic Communication Strategies in Classrooms for Students With Autism and Other Severe Handicaps There is a growing body of literature suggesting that effective communication intervention for children with autism and other severe handicaps should be focused in the child’s natural environment. This article describes a teacher training program which uses the speech-language pathologist to train classroom teachers in the use of communication intervention ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1991
Training Teachers to Use Naturalistic Communication Strategies in Classrooms for Students With Autism and Other Severe Handicaps
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathleen Dyer
    The May Institute, Inc.
  • Lori Williams
    The May Institute, Inc.
  • Stephen C. Luce
    The May Institute, Inc.
  • Requests for reprints may be sent to Kathleen Dyer, The May Institute, Inc., 100 Sea View St., P.O. Box 708, Chatham, MA 02633.
Article Information
Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / School-Based Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1991
Training Teachers to Use Naturalistic Communication Strategies in Classrooms for Students With Autism and Other Severe Handicaps
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1991, Vol. 22, 313-321. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2201.313
History: Received June 21, 1989 , Accepted February 5, 1990
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1991, Vol. 22, 313-321. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2201.313
History: Received June 21, 1989; Accepted February 5, 1990

There is a growing body of literature suggesting that effective communication intervention for children with autism and other severe handicaps should be focused in the child’s natural environment. This article describes a teacher training program which uses the speech-language pathologist to train classroom teachers in the use of communication intervention strategies in the classroom. Descriptive data support the usefulness of this model in the classroom setting.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This project was supported by the Jesse B. Cox Charitable Trust and The May Institute, Inc. The authors thank several dedicated staff for their cooperation and support throughout the study: Tom Hall and Suzanne Santarcangelo for assisting in data collection and analysis; Carter Camp, Noelle Dinn, Elizabeth Pelton, and Marilyn Murray for participating as the teachers; and Jenny Turner, Marie Williams, and Kit Hoffman for their assistance in preparation of the manuscript and figures. Finally, special thanks is extended to Charles A. Peck and Thomas Haring for their helpful comments in various phases of this project.
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