The Effectiveness of an Educational Hearing Conservation Program for Elementary School Children An educational hearing conservation (HCP) program was designed and presented to 45 normal hearing third- and fourth-grade children enrolled in regular education programs. Questionnaires assessing knowledge of hearing, noise-induced hearing loss, and hearing conservation practices were administered prior to and following a HCP which consisted of a lecture, film, hearing ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1991
The Effectiveness of an Educational Hearing Conservation Program for Elementary School Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gail D. Chermak, Ph.D.
    Washington State University, Pullman
  • Elizabeth Peters-McCarthy
    Washington State University, Pullman
  • Requests for reprints may be sent to Gail D. Chermak, Ph.D., Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2420.
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / School-Based Settings / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1991
The Effectiveness of an Educational Hearing Conservation Program for Elementary School Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1991, Vol. 22, 308-312. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2201.308
History: Received September 5, 1989 , Accepted March 29, 1990
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1991, Vol. 22, 308-312. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2201.308
History: Received September 5, 1989; Accepted March 29, 1990

An educational hearing conservation (HCP) program was designed and presented to 45 normal hearing third- and fourth-grade children enrolled in regular education programs. Questionnaires assessing knowledge of hearing, noise-induced hearing loss, and hearing conservation practices were administered prior to and following a HCP which consisted of a lecture, film, hearing screening demonstration, question and answer and discovery learning periods, and distribution of earplugs and a handout. Most children reported that they did not participate in noisy activities; however, of those who did participate an average of only 5.5% (2.5) reported use of ear protection. Knowledge about noise and noise-induced hearing loss increased an average of 23% following the HCP and 91.1% reported that they "learned something" from the HCP. Post-HCP responses revealed that 96.7% of the children intended to use ear protection when engaged in the depicted noisy activities. Although students indicated their intentions to pursue hearing conservation practices, follow-up studies are needed to determine whether hearing conservation programs are effective in establishing positive, long-term hearing health habits. School hearing conservation programs must be comprehensive in scope, including educational programming aimed at prevention and reduction of the prevalence of hearing loss, as well as identification and management of hearing loss.

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