A Signalling Device for Non-Oral Communicators Partially speaking students and users of augmentative/alternative communication systems commonly benefit from a method of signalling to initiate or repair their communicative efforts. This article describes a simple way of modifying a common, inexpensive 9-volt portable transistor radio to serve as a durable, cosmetically attractive audio oscillator signalling device that ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1991
A Signalling Device for Non-Oral Communicators
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas W. King, Ph.D.
    Department of Communication Disorders, University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire, WI 54702-4004
  • Caution: The descriptions and instructions presented in this article are applicable only to small portable transistor radios that operate on one 9-volt battery. For safety reasons, do not attempt to modify a radio that operates on any other power source, particularly AC line current from a wall outlet. Electric shock, burns, and/or fire could result.
    Caution: The descriptions and instructions presented in this article are applicable only to small portable transistor radios that operate on one 9-volt battery. For safety reasons, do not attempt to modify a radio that operates on any other power source, particularly AC line current from a wall outlet. Electric shock, burns, and/or fire could result.×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / School-Based Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1991
A Signalling Device for Non-Oral Communicators
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1991, Vol. 22, 277-282. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2201.277
History: Received September 14, 1989 , Accepted February 5, 1990
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1991, Vol. 22, 277-282. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2201.277
History: Received September 14, 1989; Accepted February 5, 1990

Partially speaking students and users of augmentative/alternative communication systems commonly benefit from a method of signalling to initiate or repair their communicative efforts. This article describes a simple way of modifying a common, inexpensive 9-volt portable transistor radio to serve as a durable, cosmetically attractive audio oscillator signalling device that can be operated by a single external switch. The unit can still be used as a radio receiver in the usual fashion. Instructions for modification and use are described, with suggestions for switches and mounting.

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