The Role of the Speech-Language Pathologist in Whole Language Many schools are implementing whole language methodology in the teaching of reading and writing. Whole language programs assume that children have a certain degree of oral language proficiency. For language-learning disabled students, such assumptions may be incorrect. The whole language literacy movement provides an excellent opportunity for speech-language pathologists to ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   October 01, 1990
The Role of the Speech-Language Pathologist in Whole Language
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carol E. Westby, Ph.D.
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
  • Requests for reprints may be sent to Carol E. Westby, Ph.D., 328 Solano NE, Albuquerque, NM 87108.
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum: Whole Language and the Speech-Language Pathologist
Clinical Forum   |   October 01, 1990
The Role of the Speech-Language Pathologist in Whole Language
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1990, Vol. 21, 228-237. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2104.228
History: Received October 9, 1989 , Accepted February 8, 1990
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1990, Vol. 21, 228-237. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2104.228
History: Received October 9, 1989; Accepted February 8, 1990

Many schools are implementing whole language methodology in the teaching of reading and writing. Whole language programs assume that children have a certain degree of oral language proficiency. For language-learning disabled students, such assumptions may be incorrect. The whole language literacy movement provides an excellent opportunity for speech-language pathologists to work as an integral part of the school team seeking to build literacy. This article presents a framework for understanding the pragmatic, semantic, syntactic, text, and phonological aspects of language that underlie both oral and written communication and gives suggestions for ways speech-language pathologists can assess children's language skills that are essential for success in a whole language program.

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