Reliability of Children's Ratings of Vocal Roughness The purpose of this study was (a) to determine the reliability associated with school-age children's judgments of vocal roughness, (b) to obtain normal-abnormal cut-off values for these judgments, and (c) to compare children's ratings to adult clinician ratings of the same samples. Ten first, third, and fifth-grade children's ratings of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1990
Reliability of Children's Ratings of Vocal Roughness
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Randolph E. Deal
    John Peter Smith Hospital, Fort Worth, TX
  • Ruth Ann Belcher
    Hurst-Euless-Bedford, Independent School District
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Randolph E. Deal, State University College at Buffalo, 1300 Elmwood Ave., Buffalo, NY 14222.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1990
Reliability of Children's Ratings of Vocal Roughness
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1990, Vol. 21, 68-71. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2102.68
History: Received June 30, 1988 , Accepted February 2, 1989
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1990, Vol. 21, 68-71. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2102.68
History: Received June 30, 1988; Accepted February 2, 1989

The purpose of this study was (a) to determine the reliability associated with school-age children's judgments of vocal roughness, (b) to obtain normal-abnormal cut-off values for these judgments, and (c) to compare children's ratings to adult clinician ratings of the same samples. Ten first, third, and fifth-grade children's ratings of normal and simulated abnormally rough vowel /a/ productions are described. Pupil ratings of normalcy and degree of severity are presented. Findings indicated that these judgments differentiated both degree and type of vowel roughness with inter and intrajudge reliability commensurate with that of graduate and postgraduate clinicians. These findings suggest a level of listening sophistication in children that is potentially useful, but not currently exploited, in most voice therapy programs.

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