Comparison of Process Targeting and Whole Language Treatments for Phonologically Delayed Preschool Children Two, 4-year-old phonologically delayed children were treated using two intervention approaches for a 6-week period. The phonological approach targeted cluster reduction through practice in production and perception of affected minimal pair contrasts in words, phrases, sentences, and story-telling tasks. The whole language approach targeted production of narratives without specific attention ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1990
Comparison of Process Targeting and Whole Language Treatments for Phonologically Delayed Preschool Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul R. Hoffman
    Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge
  • Janet A. Norris
    Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge
  • Joann Monjure
    Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Paul R. Hoffman, Ph.D., 163 Music & Dramatic Arts Building, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70808.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1990
Comparison of Process Targeting and Whole Language Treatments for Phonologically Delayed Preschool Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1990, Vol. 21, 102-109. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2102.102
History: Received October 17, 1988 , Accepted June 1, 1989
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1990, Vol. 21, 102-109. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2102.102
History: Received October 17, 1988; Accepted June 1, 1989

Two, 4-year-old phonologically delayed children were treated using two intervention approaches for a 6-week period. The phonological approach targeted cluster reduction through practice in production and perception of affected minimal pair contrasts in words, phrases, sentences, and story-telling tasks. The whole language approach targeted production of narratives without specific attention to the cluster reduction error pattern. Similar improvements were seen in the phonological performance of both children; however, the child in the whole language treatment showed greater improvements in expressive language performance. Results are discussed with respect to the holistic nature of language and its implications for phonological treatment.

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