Peer-Assisted Carryover Alternatives Carryover is a key to a child’s success in speech and language therapy. One way to achieve carryover is by giving assignments to be completed at home. However, when there is no home support some forms of cooperative learning may provide an alternative way to facilitate carryover. Cooperative learning ... Clinical Exchange
Clinical Exchange  |   July 01, 1990
Peer-Assisted Carryover Alternatives
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elise L. Dell Hazel
    Tuscarora Intermediate Unit, McVeytown, PA
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Exchange
Clinical Exchange   |   July 01, 1990
Peer-Assisted Carryover Alternatives
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1990, Vol. 21, 185-187. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2103.185
History: Received May 17, 1989 , Accepted January 29, 1990
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1990, Vol. 21, 185-187. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2103.185
History: Received May 17, 1989; Accepted January 29, 1990
Carryover is a key to a child’s success in speech and language therapy. One way to achieve carryover is by giving assignments to be completed at home. However, when there is no home support some forms of cooperative learning may provide an alternative way to facilitate carryover.
Cooperative learning has been defined by Johnson (1984)  as “positive interdependence.” Cooperative learning situations are characterized by interdependence, individual accountability, face-to-face interactions among students, and use of appropriate interpersonal and group skills (Johnson, 1984). According to Lew, Mesch, Johnson, and Johnson (1983), both positive goal and reward interdependence are needed to maximize student achievement. Webb (1982, p. 430) stated, “When every group member’s performance influences the rewards of the group, group members will support each others’ academic efforts, which in turn will lead to increased individual effort.” Mutual peer control is then elicited as a consequence (Hayes, 1983). In addition, Dansereau (1987)  found the greatest success to be with students who were paired with partners whose level of verbal ability differed from their own.
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