Self-Monitoring and Generalization in Preschool Speech-Delayed Children Self-monitoring and generalization were observed as eight preschool children progressed in management programs for their developmental phonological disorders. Changes in the production of target and non-target sounds and behaviors presumed to reflect self-monitoring were tallied as they occurred concurrently in conversational speech samples. With some notable exceptions, generalization data for ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1990
Self-Monitoring and Generalization in Preschool Speech-Delayed Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lawrence D. Shriberg
    University of Wisconsin-Madison, Phonology Project, Waisman Center on Mental Retardation and Human Development, 1500 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705
  • Joan Kwiatkowski
    University of Wisconsin-Madison, Phonology Project, Waisman Center on Mental Retardation and Human Development, 1500 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705
  • Requests for reprints should be addressed to Lawrence D. Shriberg, Phonology Project, Waisman Center on Mental Retardation and Human Development, 1500 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1990
Self-Monitoring and Generalization in Preschool Speech-Delayed Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1990, Vol. 21, 157-170. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2103.157
History: Received December 12, 1988 , Accepted June 19, 1989
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1990, Vol. 21, 157-170. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2103.157
History: Received December 12, 1988; Accepted June 19, 1989

Self-monitoring and generalization were observed as eight preschool children progressed in management programs for their developmental phonological disorders. Changes in the production of target and non-target sounds and behaviors presumed to reflect self-monitoring were tallied as they occurred concurrently in conversational speech samples. With some notable exceptions, generalization data for target and non-target sound changes were consistent with linguistic patterns reported in the literature. Self-monitoring behaviors were observed to vary in type, frequency, and point of onset in relation to generalization data. A consistent observation across children was that self-monitoring behaviors neither always nor only occurred in temporal association with generalization. Alternative hypotheses concerning the occurrence of self-monitoring behaviors in stimulus and response generalization are considered.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
We thank Jane Loncke and Maria Cavicchio for their competent and committed clinical performance with the eight children. We also thank the children and their parents for their participation. This work was supported by grants from the United States Department of Education, Research in Education of the Handicapped Program, G008400633 and the National Institutes of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke, NS-26246-01.
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