Oral Language Comprehension Using Hearing Aids and Tactile Aids Three Case Studies Case Study
Case Study  |   January 01, 1990
Oral Language Comprehension Using Hearing Aids and Tactile Aids
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Adele Proctor
    Northeastern University, Boston, MA
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Normal Language Processing / Case Study
Case Study   |   January 01, 1990
Oral Language Comprehension Using Hearing Aids and Tactile Aids
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1990, Vol. 21, 37-48. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2101.37
History: Received November 12, 1987 , Accepted April 6, 1989
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1990, Vol. 21, 37-48. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2101.37
History: Received November 12, 1987; Accepted April 6, 1989

Three prelinguistic, profoundly deaf children used a wearable, single channel, vibrotactile communication aid in conjunction with hearing aids for nearly 2 years during individual speech and language therapy at school for an average of 35 hours per year. Results of two different standardized language tests, the Scales of Early Communication Skills for Hearing Impaired Children (SECS) and the Test for Auditory Comprehension of Language (TACL), revealed that subjects exhibited a faster than average rate of learning to understand spoken language after onset of vibrotactile stimulation. An analysis of mean percent correct for individual test items on the TACL was completed for the first time that the test could be administered according to protocol and for the last test administration, 14, 12, and 16 months later for Subjects 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Results of item analysis of test content showed that, from the first to the last test administration, understanding of orally presented vocabulary improved by 27%, morphology improved by 22% and syntax improved by 6.4%.

Acknowledgments
Research funded by the Deafness Research Foundation, Grant No. RR01743, Department of Health and Human Services and the Boston-Bouve College Faculty Research Fund. Dr. Matt Fluster and Dr. Robin Becker were responsible for the design and the construction of the vibrotactile aid. Alice Atkins, Wendy Babon, Lisa Jackson, Sherry Anderson, Robert Salmon, and Lisa Rosen assisted with training and data collection. James T. Fullerton, Institute of Logopedics, Wichita, Kansas, wrote the DATATRIEVE program for analysis of test content. The author expresses appreciation to the children, their parents, and their teachers at the Boston School for the Deaf in Randolph, Massachusetts, and to Dr. Moise H. Goldstein, Jr. and Dr. Hiroshi Shimizu, Johns Hopkins University, for their invaluable consultation throughout the course of the study.
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