Defective Infant Formulas and Expressive Language Problems A Case Study Case Study
Case Study  |   January 01, 1990
Defective Infant Formulas and Expressive Language Problems
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Clara S. Wing
    Montgomery County Maryland Public Schools
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Case Study
Case Study   |   January 01, 1990
Defective Infant Formulas and Expressive Language Problems
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1990, Vol. 21, 22-27. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2101.22
History: Received September 21, 1988 , Accepted April 6, 1989
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1990, Vol. 21, 22-27. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2101.22
History: Received September 21, 1988; Accepted April 6, 1989

Two soy-based infant formulas, Neo-Mull-Soy and Cho-Free, were taken off the market in 1979 when they were found to be deficient in chloride. Some children born between 1971 and 1979 who used these formulas have been found to have persistent expressive language disorders, particularly word retrieval problems, as well as other developmental problems. Medical studies of such children are reported, and a case study describes and contrasts the development of fraternal twins, only one of whom had the chloride-deficient formula. Although both twins were normal at birth and developed at the same rate before Neo-Mull-Soy was prescribed for one of them, their history diverges sharply from that point. Language and learning ability test results and academic achievement are compared for the language disabled and the normal twin. Children with similar problems may come to the attention of speech-language pathologists throughout the United States.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
I am deeply grateful to Mary G. Enig, Ph.D., Research Associate in Nutritional Sciences, University of Maryland, and to Dr. Patricia Quinn, Pediatrician, for providing information for the section on the importance of chloride in nutrition, to Lynn J. Pilot and Carol R. Laskin, who helped me understand the work of FORMULA, to Elinor L. Zaslow for comments on an earlier draft of this manuscript, and to Bruce, Rob, and their parents for tireless cooperation.
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