The Social Interactive Coding System (SICS) An On-Line, Clinically Relevant Descriptive Tool Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1990
The Social Interactive Coding System (SICS)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mabel L. Rice
    Child Language Program, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
  • Marie A. Sell
    Child Language Program, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
  • Pamela A. Hadley
    Department of Speech-Language-Hearing, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
  • Requests for reprints may be sent to Mabel L. Rice, Child Language Program, University of Kansas, 1043 Indiana St., Lawrence, KS 66044.
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1990
The Social Interactive Coding System (SICS)
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1990, Vol. 21, 2-14. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2101.02
History: Received June 3, 1988 , Accepted December 5, 1988
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1990, Vol. 21, 2-14. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2101.02
History: Received June 3, 1988; Accepted December 5, 1988

The Social Interactive Coding System was designed to describe the continuous verbal interactions of preschool children as a function of play areas, addressees, script codes, and play levels. The targeted verbal dimension is assertiveness/responsiveness, indexed by initiations versus responses for conversational turns. SICS can be completed in a minimum amount of time, without access to special equipment or time-consuming transcription. It provides a helpful supplement to conventional communication assessment tools, for the purposes of determining treatment goals, describing baseline and treatment progress.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Preparation of this manuscript was supported by a Training Grant from NICHHD (#HD07255). Special appreciation is extended to the children of the Language Acquisition Preschool and their parents for their unfailing cooperation and support. Special recognition goes to our colleague Kim Wilcox, codirector of LAP, who provided helpful advice on the development of SICS. A special thank you is due to Kim Morenz, the LAP Lead Teacher, who allowed observers in the classroom and offered many helpful suggestions.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access