Positioning Students with Cerebral Palsy to Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication Many students who use augmentative and alternative communication have severe forms of cerebral palsy which make it necessary to consider positioning as part of their communication intervention. This paper reviews the interrelated communication and positioning needs of these students, and then proposes the wheelchair as the primary position for use ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1990
Positioning Students with Cerebral Palsy to Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Irene R. McEwen
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Lyle L. Lloyd
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Irene R. McEwen is currently in the Department of Physical Therapy, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, P.O. Box 26901, Oklahoma City, OK 73190.
    Irene R. McEwen is currently in the Department of Physical Therapy, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, P.O. Box 26901, Oklahoma City, OK 73190.×
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Irene R. McEwen, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, P.O. Box 26901, Oklahoma City, OK 73190.
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1990
Positioning Students with Cerebral Palsy to Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1990, Vol. 21, 15-21. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2101.15
History: Received August 4, 1988 , Accepted February 20, 1989
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1990, Vol. 21, 15-21. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2101.15
History: Received August 4, 1988; Accepted February 20, 1989

Many students who use augmentative and alternative communication have severe forms of cerebral palsy which make it necessary to consider positioning as part of their communication intervention. This paper reviews the interrelated communication and positioning needs of these students, and then proposes the wheelchair as the primary position for use of a communication aid. Guidelines for good wheelchair positioning are presented.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Preparation of this paper was partially supported by a Preparation in Leadership Personnel grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs and Rehabilitative Services (#G008630079) and the Foundation for Physical Therapy. However, it does not represent the official policy or position of either organization.
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