A Cross-Sectional Developmental Study of Final Consonant Production in Southern Black Children from Preschool through Third Grade The sounds-in-words subtest of the Goldman Fristoe Test of Articulation (GFTA) was administered to 222 Black children in preschool through third grade. The children resided in rural east central Alabama, and used the Black English dialect common to that region. The children's responses were analyzed using the PROPH computer program ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1989
A Cross-Sectional Developmental Study of Final Consonant Production in Southern Black Children from Preschool through Third Grade
 
Author Notes
  • William O. Haynes and Michael J. Moran are in the Department of Communication Disorders, Auburn University, 1199 Haley Center, Auburn, AL 36849-3501. Requests for reprints may be sent to them at this address.
    William O. Haynes and Michael J. Moran are in the Department of Communication Disorders, Auburn University, 1199 Haley Center, Auburn, AL 36849-3501. Requests for reprints may be sent to them at this address.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1989
A Cross-Sectional Developmental Study of Final Consonant Production in Southern Black Children from Preschool through Third Grade
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1989, Vol. 20, 400-406. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2004.400
History: Received February 12, 1988 , Accepted September 26, 1988
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1989, Vol. 20, 400-406. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2004.400
History: Received February 12, 1988; Accepted September 26, 1988

The sounds-in-words subtest of the Goldman Fristoe Test of Articulation (GFTA) was administered to 222 Black children in preschool through third grade. The children resided in rural east central Alabama, and used the Black English dialect common to that region. The children's responses were analyzed using the PROPH computer program for analysis of phonological processes. The analysis revealed phonological process patterns similar to those reported in the developmental literature with the exception of final consonant deletion. The data suggest that southern Black children continue to delete final consonants well beyond the age indicated by norms gathered on predominantly White subjects. Clinical implications are discussed.

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